Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-17-2020

Comments

This is the final published article in JMIR Medical Education, 2020, Nov.17;6(2):e19792.

The article can also be found on the journal's webpage: https://doi.org/10.2196/19792

Copyright. The Authors.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Nasal osteotomy is a commonly performed procedure during rhinoplasty for both functional and cosmetic reasons. Teaching and learning this procedure proves difficult due to the reliance on nuanced tactile feedback. For surgical simulation, trainees are traditionally limited to cadaveric bones, which can be costly and difficult to obtain.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to design and print a low-cost midface model for nasal osteotomy simulation.

METHODS: A 3D reconstruction of the midface was modified using the free open-source design software Meshmixer (Autodesk Inc). The pyriform aperture was smoothed, and support rods were added to hold the fragments generated from the simulation in place. Several models with various infill densities were printed using a desktop 3D printer to determine which model best mimicked human facial bone.

RESULTS: A midface simulation set was designed using a desktop 3D printer, polylactic acid filament, and easily accessible tools. A nasal osteotomy procedure was successfully simulated using the model.

CONCLUSIONS: 3D printing is a low-cost, accessible technology that can be used to create simulation models. With growing restrictions on trainee duty hours, the simulation set can be used by programs to augment surgical training.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

PubMed ID

33200998

Language

English

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