Authors

Clemens Krepler, Wistar InstituteFollow
Katrin Sproesser, Wistar Institute
Patricia Brafford, Wistar InstituteFollow
Marilda Beqiri, Wistar InstituteFollow
Bradley Garman, University of Pennsylvania
Min Xiao, Wistar Institute
Batool Shannan, Wistar Institute
Andrea Watters, Wistar Institute
Michela Perego, Wistar Institute
Gao Zhang, Wistar Institute
Adina Vultur, Wistar Institute
Xiangfan Yin, Wistar Institute
Qin Liu, Wistar InstituteFollow
Ioannis N Anastopoulos, University of PennsylvaniaFollow
Bradley Wubbenhorst, University of Pennsylvania
Melissa A. Wilson, University of Pennsylvania
Wei Xu, University of Pennsylvania
Giorgos Karakousis, University of PennsylvaniaFollow
Michael Feldman, University of Pennsylvania
Xiaowei Xu, University of Pennsylvania
Ravi Amaravadi, University of Pennsylvania
Tara C. Gangadhar, University of Pennsylvania
David E. Elder, University of Pennsylvania
Lauren E. Haydu, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas
Jennifer A. Wargo, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas
Michael A. Davies, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of TexasFollow
Yiling Lu, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas
Gordon B. Mills, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of TexasFollow
Dennie T. Frederick, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer CenterFollow
Michal Barzily-Rokni, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center
Keith T. Flaherty, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer CenterFollow
Dave S. Hoon, John Wayne Cancer Institute
Michael Guarino, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at Christiana CareFollow
Joseph J. Bennett, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at Christiana CareFollow
Randall W. Ryan, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at Christiana Care
Nicholas J. Petrelli, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at Christiana Care
Carol L. Shields, Thomas Jefferson UniversityFollow
Mizue Terai, Thomas Jefferson UniversityFollow
Takami Sato, Thomas Jefferson UniversityFollow
Andrew E. Aplin, Thomas Jefferson UniversityFollow
Alexander Roesch, University Duisburg-Essen; German Consortium of Translational Cancer Research
David Darr, University of North Carolina
Steve Angus, University of North Carolina
Rakesh Kumar, Glaxosmithkline
Ensar Halilovic, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research
Giordano Caponigro, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research
Sebastien Jeay, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research
Jens Wuerthner, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research
Annette Walter, Bayer Pharma AG
Matthias Ocker, Bayer Pharma AG
Matthew B. Boxer, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH
Lynn Schuchter, University of Pennsylvania
Katherine L Nathanson, University of PennsylvaniaFollow
Meenhard Herlyn, The Wistar Institute

Document Type

Article

Presentation Date

11-14-2017

Comments

This article has been peer reviewed. It is the author’s final published version in Cell Reports

Volume 21, Issue 7, November 2017, Pages 1953-1967

The published version is available at DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.10.021. Copyright © Krepler et al.

Abstract

Therapy of advanced melanoma is changing dramatically. Following mutational and biological subclassification of this heterogeneous cancer, several targeted and immune therapies were approved and increased survival significantly. To facilitate further advancements through pre-clinical in vivo modeling, we have established 459 patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and live tissue samples from 384 patients representing the full spectrum of clinical, therapeutic, mutational, and biological heterogeneity of melanoma. PDX have been characterized using targeted sequencing and protein arrays and are clinically annotated. This exhaustive live tissue resource includes PDX from 57 samples resistant to targeted therapy, 61 samples from responders and non-responders to immune checkpoint blockade, and 31 samples from brain metastasis. Uveal, mucosal, and acral subtypes are represented as well. We show examples of pre-clinical trials that highlight how the PDX collection can be used to develop and optimize precision therapies, biomarkers of response, and the targeting of rare genetic subgroups.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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