Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-23-2021

Comments

This is the author's final version of the manuscript published in Psychiatric Services, 2021 Apr 23.

The final published article can be found on the journal's website: https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201900615.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Integration of general medical care and mental health care is a high priority for individuals with serious mental illnesses because of their high risk of morbidity and early mortality. The Bridge is a peer-led, health navigator intervention designed to improve access to and use of health care and self-management of medical services by individuals with serious mental illnesses. This study expands on a previous study in which the authors examined participants' self-reported outcomes from a 12-month randomized controlled trial of the Bridge. In the study reported here, Medicaid data were used to assess the impact of the intervention on service use during that trial.

METHODS: Medicaid data on use of general medical services (emergency room, outpatient, and inpatient) for 6 months were compared for 144 individuals with serious mental illnesses-Bridge participants (N=72) and a waitlist control group (N=72). An intent-to-treat approach was used, with regression models controlling for general medical services in the 6 months before baseline.

RESULTS: Zero-inflated negative binomial analyses, controlling for service use 6 months before baseline, found that the intervention group used the emergency room significantly less frequently, compared with the control group (adjusted mean±SD number of visits, 0.72±0.19 versus 1.59±0.42). No between-group differences were found in use of general medical inpatient or outpatient services.

CONCLUSIONS: The Bridge was effective in decreasing emergency room use among individuals with serious mental illnesses.

PubMed ID

33887952

Language

English

Available for download on Saturday, April 23, 2022

Share

COinS