Event Title

Bottom up – Top down: The Development of a Center for Interprofessional Healthcare Education Using a Complex Leadership Framework

Start Date

19-5-2012 9:45 AM

End Date

19-5-2012 10:00 AM

Description

Interprofessional education (IPE) is gaining momentum as a system for connecting higher education and healthcare systems, fostering collaboration between and among higher education departments and programs, and in healthcare delivery. The definition of IPE and the shift in focus from multiple uniprofessions to inteprofessionalism matches many of the principles of complexity science. The purpose of this work in progress presentation is to describe the application of complexity leadership to the development of a center for interprofessional healthcare education.

The Center for Interprofessional Healthcare Education at Quinnipiac University was named by the vice president for academic affairs in October of 2011. The Center was given an annual operating budget and personnel supports. The center evolved from a robust grass-roots momentum, beginning in October 2010, with a committee of 34 individuals representing eight different

departments and three schools who had philosophical support from three deans. The committee’s passion for education of students and the ultimate goal of excellence in team-based healthcare provided the momentum. However, in order to fuel the momentum among the diversities of individual professions’ ideas, language, schedules, accreditation standards, and the literature of interprofessionalism itself, the leaders of this momentum needed to shift their leadership style. Complexity leadership appeared to be an excellent model to address the opportunities and challenges of multiple interacting elements in IPE.

Using the complex leadership model of management and decision-making (Snowden & Booner, 2007), this session will focus on the challenges and opportunities that may apply to any developing IPE program in order to create an environment of increased interaction, collaboration, idea generation, and compromise that will allow for multiple professions to meet a shared goal of interprofessionalism. Preliminary reflections on the effectiveness of this leadership model as well as recommendations for future outcomes will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session participants will:

1. Identify four to five common opportunities in developing an IPE center.

2. Identify four to five challenges in developing an IPE center.

3. Identify strategies from complexity science as a leadership method that may transform the challenges to additional opportunities for IPE.

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May 19th, 9:45 AM May 19th, 10:00 AM

Bottom up – Top down: The Development of a Center for Interprofessional Healthcare Education Using a Complex Leadership Framework

Interprofessional education (IPE) is gaining momentum as a system for connecting higher education and healthcare systems, fostering collaboration between and among higher education departments and programs, and in healthcare delivery. The definition of IPE and the shift in focus from multiple uniprofessions to inteprofessionalism matches many of the principles of complexity science. The purpose of this work in progress presentation is to describe the application of complexity leadership to the development of a center for interprofessional healthcare education.

The Center for Interprofessional Healthcare Education at Quinnipiac University was named by the vice president for academic affairs in October of 2011. The Center was given an annual operating budget and personnel supports. The center evolved from a robust grass-roots momentum, beginning in October 2010, with a committee of 34 individuals representing eight different

departments and three schools who had philosophical support from three deans. The committee’s passion for education of students and the ultimate goal of excellence in team-based healthcare provided the momentum. However, in order to fuel the momentum among the diversities of individual professions’ ideas, language, schedules, accreditation standards, and the literature of interprofessionalism itself, the leaders of this momentum needed to shift their leadership style. Complexity leadership appeared to be an excellent model to address the opportunities and challenges of multiple interacting elements in IPE.

Using the complex leadership model of management and decision-making (Snowden & Booner, 2007), this session will focus on the challenges and opportunities that may apply to any developing IPE program in order to create an environment of increased interaction, collaboration, idea generation, and compromise that will allow for multiple professions to meet a shared goal of interprofessionalism. Preliminary reflections on the effectiveness of this leadership model as well as recommendations for future outcomes will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session participants will:

1. Identify four to five common opportunities in developing an IPE center.

2. Identify four to five challenges in developing an IPE center.

3. Identify strategies from complexity science as a leadership method that may transform the challenges to additional opportunities for IPE.