Title

Bitter taste receptors: novel therapeutic targets for asthma

Document Type

Presentation

Publication Date

1-14-2015

Comments

My laboratory studies intracellular signaling regulating contraction, relaxation and proliferation of airway smooth muscle with particular emphasis on G protein coupled receptor mediated signaling. Current projects include understanding age-dependent changes in airway smooth muscle function (funded by NIA/NIH) and bitter taste receptor signaling in airway smooth muscle (funded by American Asthma Foundation). Airway smooth muscle is the principle contractile component of airways, and contraction and relaxation of ASM regulate airway diameter. Any alteration in ASM function results in bronchoconstriction and difficulty in breathing. Therefore, ASM acts as a primary therapeutic target in obstructive airway diseases such as asthma and COPD. Delineating novel receptors and signaling mechanisms that regulate ASM function would provide basis for developing newer and better drugs to treat asthma.

Abstract

Objectives:

  1. Understand identification of new class of receptors on airway cells
  2. Discuss potential therapeutic implications of bitter taste receptor signaling in airway diseases
  3. Explore experimental tools and animal models to study molecular pathogenesis of obstructive pulmonary diseases

Overall Goals and Objectives:

Following this activity, a participant should be able to:

1. Recognize recent advances and developments in Pulmonary Medicine & Critical Care and translate into clinical practice

2. Integrate perspectives of multiple disciplines into decision-making on behalf of patients through structured plans for patient care.

3. Develop areas for future research and discuss appropriate methods to address these needs.

4. Summarize and continually improve communications as a team, caring for Pulmonary/Critical Care patients.

Presentation: 1 hour

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