Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-26-2020

Comments

This article is the authors' final version prior to publication in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Volume 117, Issue 21, May 2020, Article number A54.

The published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2000074117. Copyright © Adler et al.

Abstract

Pathogens pose significant threats to pollinator health and food security. Pollinators can transmit diseases during foraging, but the consequences of plant species composition for infection is unknown. In agroecosystems, flowering strips or hedgerows are often used to augment pollinator habitat. We used canola as a focal crop in tents and manipulated flowering strip composition using plant species we had previously shown to result in higher or lower bee infection in short-term trials. We also manipulated initial colony infection to assess impacts on foraging behavior. Flowering strips using high-infection plant species nearly doubled bumble bee colony infection intensity compared to low-infection plant species, with intermediate infection in canola-only tents. Both infection treatment and flowering strips reduced visits to canola, but we saw no evidence that infection treatment shifted foraging preferences. Although high-infection flowering strips increased colony infection intensity, colony reproduction was improved with any flowering strips compared to canola alone. Effects of flowering strips on colony reproduction were explained by nectar availability, but effects of flowering strips on infection intensity were not. Thus, flowering strips benefited colony reproduction by adding floral resources, but certain plant species also come with a risk of increased pathogen infection intensity.

PubMed ID

32393622

Language

English

Available for download on Thursday, November 26, 2020

Included in

Biology Commons

Share

COinS