Title

Simulation Centers and Simulation-Based Education during the Time of COVID 19: A Multi-Center Best Practice Position Paper by the World Academic Council of Emergency Medicine.

Authors

Fatimah Lateef, Senior Consultant, Department of Emergency Medicine, Singapore General Hospital, Professor, Duke NUS Graduate Medical School, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National, University of Singapore and Lee Kong Chian Medical School, Nanyang Technological University, Director, SingHealth Duke NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), Philadelphia, USA
Madhavi Suppiah, Assistant Director, SingHealth Duke NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), Philadelphia, USA
Shruti Chandra, Assistant Professor, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Department of Emergency Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, USAFollow
Too Xin Yi, Assistant Manager, SingHealth Duke NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), Wellington, New Zealand
Willy Darmawan, Senior Executive, SingHealth Duke NUS Institute of Medical Simulation (SIMS), Wellington, New Zealand
Brad Peckler, Emergency Medicine Specialist and Director of The Wellington Regional Simulation and Skills Center, Capital and Coast District Health Board, Wellington, New Zealand
Veronica Tucci, Research and Scholarly Activity Director, Oak Hill Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Brooksville, FL USA, Professor of Research and Emergency Medicine, Hattiesburg, MS USA
Alfredo Tirado, Program Director, Oak Hill Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Brooksville, FL USA
Lorraine Mendez, Simulation Director, Oak Hill Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Brooksville, FL USA
Lisa Moreno, President of AAEM, Florida State University Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Associate Professor Florida State University, Sarasota, FL USA
Sagar Galwankar, Research Director, Florida State University Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Associate Professor Florida State University, Sarasota, FL USA

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2021

Comments

This article is the author's final published version in Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock, Volume 14, Issue 1, January-March 2021, Pages 3-13.

The published version is available at https://doi.org/10.4103/JETS.JETS_185_20

Copyright © 2021 Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications. All rights reserved.

This is an open access journal, and articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as appropriate credit is given and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

Abstract

COVID 19 struck us all like a bolt of lightning and for the past 10 months, it has tested our resilience, agility, creativity, and adaptability in all aspects of our lives and work. Simulation centers and simulation-based educational programs have not been spared. Rather than wait for the pandemic to be over before commencing operations and training, we have been actively looking at programs, reviewing alternative methods such as e-learning, use of virtual learning platforms, decentralization of training using in situ simulation (ISS) modeling, partnerships with relevant clinical departments, cross-training of staff to attain useful secondary skills, and many other alternatives and substitutes. It has been an eye-opening journey as we maximize our staff's talent and potential in new adoptions and stretching our goals beyond what we deemed was possible. This paper shares perspectives from simulation centers; The SingHealth Duke NUS Institute of Medical Simulation which is integrated with an Academic Medical Center in Singapore, The Robert and Dorothy Rector Clinical Skills and Simulation Center, which is integrated with Thomas Jefferson University, Oakhill Emergency Department, Florida State University Emergency Medicine Program, Florida, USA and The Wellington Regional Simulation and skills center. It describes the experiences from the time when COVID 19 first struck countries around the world to the current state whereby the simulation centers have stWWarting functioning in their "new norm." These centers were representative examples of those in countries which had extremely heavy (USA), moderate (Singapore) as well as light (New Zealand) load of COVID 19 cases in the nation. Whichever categories these centers were in, they all faced disruption and had to make the necessary adjustments, aligning with national policies and advisories. As there is no existing tried and tested model for the running of a simulation center during an infectious disease pandemic, this can serve as a landmark reference paper, as we continue to fine-tune and prepare for the next new, emerging infectious disease or crisis.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

PubMed ID

33911429

Language

English

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