Start Date

7-6-2011 10:45 AM

End Date

7-6-2011 11:30 AM

Description

Janine Jagger, PhD, is an epidemiologist specializing in injury prevention and control. Early in her career, her research and advocacy focused on brain trauma and motor vehicle safety.

Over the last 20 years, Dr. Jagger has devoted herself to reducing healthcare workplace transmission of bloodborne pathogens. In 1988, Dr. Jagger and colleagues published a landmark study in the New England Journal of Medicine which detailed the characteristics of medical devices causing needlestick injuries, and criteria for protective needle designs. This pioneering research provided the foundation for the development of a new generation of safer medical devices.


In 1991, Dr. Jagger developed the EPINet surveillance system to provide healthcare facilities with a standardized system for tracking needlestick injuries and blood and body fluid exposures; it is now used by over 1,500 healthcare facilities in the US, and in more than 50 countries around the world. The worldwide dissemination of EPINet has resulted in worldwide access to data on the causes and prevention of healthcare workplace exposures to bloodborne pathogens.

In 2002, Dr. Jagger received one of the most prestigious awards in the US: a MacArthur Foundation fellowship. The award is given to individuals who have shown "extraordinary originality" and dedication in their professional pursuits.

Dr. Jagger and a team of colleagues are the inventors of six patented safety needle devices, which were honored with a Distinguished Inventor Award in 1988 by Intellectual Property Owners, Inc., and displayed by the US Patent and Trademark Office in its 1990 Bicentennial Exhibit. In addition to ongoing research and public policy efforts, Dr. Jagger collaborates with and is consulted by government agencies in the US and abroad, private industry, non-profit organizations, and academic institutions in the areas of safer medical device design and the prevention of healthcare-mediated exposures to bloodborne pathogens.

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Jun 7th, 10:45 AM Jun 7th, 11:30 AM

Overcoming barries to compliance

Janine Jagger, PhD, is an epidemiologist specializing in injury prevention and control. Early in her career, her research and advocacy focused on brain trauma and motor vehicle safety.

Over the last 20 years, Dr. Jagger has devoted herself to reducing healthcare workplace transmission of bloodborne pathogens. In 1988, Dr. Jagger and colleagues published a landmark study in the New England Journal of Medicine which detailed the characteristics of medical devices causing needlestick injuries, and criteria for protective needle designs. This pioneering research provided the foundation for the development of a new generation of safer medical devices.


In 1991, Dr. Jagger developed the EPINet surveillance system to provide healthcare facilities with a standardized system for tracking needlestick injuries and blood and body fluid exposures; it is now used by over 1,500 healthcare facilities in the US, and in more than 50 countries around the world. The worldwide dissemination of EPINet has resulted in worldwide access to data on the causes and prevention of healthcare workplace exposures to bloodborne pathogens.

In 2002, Dr. Jagger received one of the most prestigious awards in the US: a MacArthur Foundation fellowship. The award is given to individuals who have shown "extraordinary originality" and dedication in their professional pursuits.

Dr. Jagger and a team of colleagues are the inventors of six patented safety needle devices, which were honored with a Distinguished Inventor Award in 1988 by Intellectual Property Owners, Inc., and displayed by the US Patent and Trademark Office in its 1990 Bicentennial Exhibit. In addition to ongoing research and public policy efforts, Dr. Jagger collaborates with and is consulted by government agencies in the US and abroad, private industry, non-profit organizations, and academic institutions in the areas of safer medical device design and the prevention of healthcare-mediated exposures to bloodborne pathogens.