Title

Airway Smooth Muscle: A New Target in the Treatment of Irreversible Airflow Obstruction in Asthma?

Document Type

Presentation

Publication Date

2-12-2014

Comments

Dr. Panettieri directs the Airways Biology Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania. His interests are in the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate airway smooth muscle cell growth and the immunobiology of airway smooth muscle. Consequences of increases in airway smooth muscle growth promote the development of irreversible airflow obstruction and airway remodeling seen in subjects with chronic severe asthma. Dr. Panettieri's lab also focuses on cytosolic signaling pathways that mediate gene expression and alter myocyte function.

Dr. Panettieri also serves as the Deputy Director of the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology. He directs the human exposure chamber that defines the molecular mechanisms regulating ozone- and particulate matter-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

In parallel with his basic science interests, Dr. Panettieri currently directs the comprehensive clinical program for the care of patients with asthma and is actively involved in clinical investigations focused on the management of asthma and COPD.

In addition to his research and clinical interests, Dr. Panettieri served as chairperson of the NIH Lung Cellular, Molecular, and Immunobiology Study Section, is a member of the NIH Distinguished Editorial Panel and is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and Association of American Physicians.

Abstract

Objectives:

1. Obtain a better understanding of irreversible airflow obstruction in asthma

2. Focus on processes that mediate glucocorticoid insensitivity

3. Address the role of airway smooth muscle function in promoting irreversible airflow obstruction

4. Address subpopulations of airway smooth muscle that contribute to airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, hyperplasia and irreversible airflow obstruction

Presentation: 56 minutes