Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-1985

Comments

This article has been peer reviewed. It is the author’s final published version in The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Volume 39, Issue 4, April 1985, Pages 247-252.

The published version is available at DOI: 10.5014/ajot.39.4.247. Copyright © American Occupational Therapy Association

Abstract

This study investigated the frequency of vestibular disorders in developmentally disabled preschoolers who did and who did not have a history of otitis media. Fifteen children with a history of otitis media and fifteen children with no history of otitis media were given two tests for vestibular functioning: the Southern California Postrotary Nystagmus Test (SCPNT) and the Lateral Labyrinthine Righting Reaction (LLRR), acting on the head. The scores on these tests were dichotomized, and a correlation between these two tests as measures of vestibular function was obtained. Because this correlation did not reach a satisfactory level, two a satisfactory level, two separate chi-square analyses were performed to examine the frequency of vestibular disorders with otitis media. Both tests showed a statistically significant difference in the incidence of vestibular disorders between the two groups of children; the group having otitis media demonstrated more vestibular disorders. The SCPNT demonstrated more striking results than did LLRR. This finding is related to the two tests measuring different aspects of vestibular functioning; the separate chi-square analyses were performed to examine the frequency of vestibular disorders with otitis media. Both tests showed a statistically significant difference in the incidence of vestibular disorders between the two groups of children; the group having otitis media demonstrated more vestibular disorders. The SCPNT demonstrated more striking results than did LLRR. This finding is related to the two tests measuring different aspects of vestibular functioning; the SCPNT reflects semicircular canal functioning, and the LLRR reflects utricular and saccular functioning. The criteria used for LLRR (four seconds) also may have influenced the results obtained using this test.

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