Authors

Xu Guo, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Cell Biology, Cell Engineering Research Center, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China
Yanna Ba, Department of Clinical Immunology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China
Xi Ma, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Cell Biology, Cell Engineering Research Center, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China
Jiaze An, Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China
Yukui Shang, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Cell Biology, Cell Engineering Research Center, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China
Qichao Huang, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Cell Biology, Cell Engineering Research Center, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China
Hushan Yang, Division of Population Science, Department of Medical Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of AmericaFollow
Zhinan Chen, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Cell Biology, Cell Engineering Research Center, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China
Jinliang Xing, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Cell Biology, Cell Engineering Research Center, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-12-2011

Comments

This article has been peer reviewed and is published in PLoS One 2011, 6(12). The published version is available at DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0028404. © Public Library of Science

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is significantly correlated to the accumulation of genomic alterations. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has been applied to a wide range of tumors including HCCs for the genome-wide high resolution screening of DNA copy number changes. However, the relevant chromosomal variations that play a central role in the development of HCC still are not fully elucidated.

METHODS: In present study, in order to further characterize the copy number alterations (CNAs) important to HCC development, we conducted a meta-analysis of four published independent array-CGH datasets including total 159 samples.

RESULTS: Eighty five significant gains (frequency ≥ 25%) were mostly mapped to five broad chromosomal regions including 1q, 6p, 8q, 17q and 20p, as well as two narrow regions 5p15.33 and 9q34.2-34.3. Eighty eight significant losses (frequency ≥ 25%) were most frequently present in 4q, 6q, 8p, 9p, 13q, 14q, 16q, and 17p. Significant correlations existed between chromosomal aberrations either located on the same chromosome or the different chromosomes. HCCs with different etiologies largely exhibited surprisingly similar profiles of chromosomal aberrations with only a few exceptions. Furthermore, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis indicated that the genes affected by these chromosomal aberrations were significantly enriched in 31 canonical pathways with the highest enrichment observed for antiviral immunity pathways.

CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our findings provide novel and important clues for the implications of antiviral immunity-related gene pathways in the pathogenesis and progression of HCC.

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