Event Title

Bridging the Gap between Physician Office and Home: Meeting the Needs of Patients with Dementia and their Families through Interprofessional Collaboration

Start Date

19-5-2012 11:15 AM

End Date

19-5-2012 11:30 AM

Description

Nearly 5.3 million individuals in the United Statestoday have Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias, and 70% are living at home, with varying levels of care provided by family. Patients with dementia and their family members are often under-recognized and underserved, thus informal caregivers typically receive no formal training in how to care for their family member. To meet this un-met need Jefferson Elder Care (JEC) has established a program in which patients and caregivers are served through an in-home Medicare Part B reimbursable clinical occupational therapy service. Our in-home dementia care service effectively enhances the patient’s participation in daily activities and educates the family caregiver using Jefferson’s evidence-based, Skills2Care™. This program is seamlessly integrated into the specialized dementia service to increase caregiver knowledge and to develop the skills to care successfully for their family member at home. The program improves caregiver confidence, abilities, and a sense of well-being, which collectively enhance function and safety for the patient. Strategies are developed and implemented through a customized approach addressing the unique needs and environments of each individual family.

Essential to the success of the dementia is collaboration with the referring physician; in which diagnostic test results and physician impressions are shared with the in-home practitioner, and evaluation results (including home environmental characteristics, and family participation) are shared with the referring physician. In this model, physician and occupational therapist engage in an on-going exchange of findings throughout the episode of care, which can prove especially valuable in matters of safety and medication management.

This seminar will present key features of this collaborative model which enhances quality of care and family involvement. Specific approaches and strategies established between JEC and M. Serruya, in the Department of Neurology will be highlighted. Cases will be presented that exemplify the benefits of interprofessional collaboration.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will:

1. Recognize the care needs of patients with dementia and their families and the challenges they face.

2. Describe key features of an effective collaborative model between referring physician and in-home practitioner when treating patients with dementia.

3. Identify successful communication strategies between physician, in-home practitioner, and administrative staff that facilitate continuity of care.

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May 19th, 11:15 AM May 19th, 11:30 AM

Bridging the Gap between Physician Office and Home: Meeting the Needs of Patients with Dementia and their Families through Interprofessional Collaboration

Nearly 5.3 million individuals in the United Statestoday have Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias, and 70% are living at home, with varying levels of care provided by family. Patients with dementia and their family members are often under-recognized and underserved, thus informal caregivers typically receive no formal training in how to care for their family member. To meet this un-met need Jefferson Elder Care (JEC) has established a program in which patients and caregivers are served through an in-home Medicare Part B reimbursable clinical occupational therapy service. Our in-home dementia care service effectively enhances the patient’s participation in daily activities and educates the family caregiver using Jefferson’s evidence-based, Skills2Care™. This program is seamlessly integrated into the specialized dementia service to increase caregiver knowledge and to develop the skills to care successfully for their family member at home. The program improves caregiver confidence, abilities, and a sense of well-being, which collectively enhance function and safety for the patient. Strategies are developed and implemented through a customized approach addressing the unique needs and environments of each individual family.

Essential to the success of the dementia is collaboration with the referring physician; in which diagnostic test results and physician impressions are shared with the in-home practitioner, and evaluation results (including home environmental characteristics, and family participation) are shared with the referring physician. In this model, physician and occupational therapist engage in an on-going exchange of findings throughout the episode of care, which can prove especially valuable in matters of safety and medication management.

This seminar will present key features of this collaborative model which enhances quality of care and family involvement. Specific approaches and strategies established between JEC and M. Serruya, in the Department of Neurology will be highlighted. Cases will be presented that exemplify the benefits of interprofessional collaboration.

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will:

1. Recognize the care needs of patients with dementia and their families and the challenges they face.

2. Describe key features of an effective collaborative model between referring physician and in-home practitioner when treating patients with dementia.

3. Identify successful communication strategies between physician, in-home practitioner, and administrative staff that facilitate continuity of care.