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Description

Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) affects over 300,000 Americans per year.1 Many factors affect the outcomes and overall OHCA survival in a community; some of these include an individual’s characteristics such as age, co-morbid conditions, availability of an AED on scene, time to CPR, and the characteristics of the hospital they are treated at.1,2 Directly following resuscitation from cardiac arrest, the individual is at risk of developing numerous problems caused by sequelae of ischemic injury sustained during the arrest. The national average rate of survival to discharge is only 10%.2,3 Many of these factors are modifiable and provide an opportunity to improve outcomes. In our project, we focus on lifesustaining procedures administered by hospitals upon receiving and admitting individuals experiencing OHCA.

We used previously validated measures as defined by Barnato et al as “life sustaining end of life (EOL) measures”:4

• Intubation and mechanical ventilation

• Tracheostomy

• Gastrostomy tube insertion

• Hemodialysis

• Enteral/parenteral nutrition

• CPR

Publication Date

10-24-2017

Keywords

Assessing Variability in End-of-Life Intensity of Care After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest, Thomas Jefferson University, College within a College, CWIC

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Assessing Variability in End-of-Life Intensity of Care After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

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